Monday, April 27, 2015

The Myster Writers of America Cookbook, edited by Kate White

This cookbook is a collection of the favorite recipes of some well-known mystery writers.  The hardbound book is very nice and even has a ribbon bookmark.  The photo doesn't do it justice! Each recipe begins with a short note from the author that explains the origin of the recipe or just some personal information.

The recipes are a wonderful variety of recipes from gourmet to family fare.  The first recipe I tried was Gillian Flynn’s Beef Skillet Fiesta. She started her paragraph with “Be warned: I am no gourmet.”  Her recipe was certainly not gourmet, but it was just what I was looking for that night.  It was a good, easy, fast, and delicious family meal.  This cookbook is now filled with bits of paper making all of the recipes I want to try. Not ever recipe has a photo, but quite a few have nice full-page photos. This one has earned a place on my permanent cookbook shelf.


Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Breaker's Reef by Terri Blackstock

I wish I had known that this was book 4 of a series. I found the characters confusing because I did not know the history behind them. 

The story was too predictable. The more the finger pointed to a suspect the more sure I was that it was a false lead.   

The relationships were nice, but I just couldn’t connect with any of the characters. Not a bad read, just not her best.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Fribbet the Frog and the Tadpoles by Carole P. Roman

In this Captain No Beard story my favorite character, Fribbet the Frog, has a problem. He is crying his eyes out, and he has the weight of the world on his shoulders. The rest of the crew tries to understand his problem and help him through it.  Fribbet feels left out because Mom and Dad are busy with all of the new tadpoles, but the crew helps him learn all about being a big brother.

The Captain No Beard stories are the imaginary adventures of Alexander and his friends. They are fun, educational and teach children about friendships and caring relationships. This is another great addition to the series.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Lighten Up Y'all by Virginia Willis

This is an attractive book with large color photos of many of the recipes. Most of the recipes are of light fair, but I found some of the recipes odd. In one recipe you add canned no-salt tomatoes, but then later in the recipe you are told to add coarse kosher salt. Salt is Salt. The Makeover Broccoli Mac and cheese calls for 1 cup shredded 50 percent reduced fat extra sharp Cheddar cheese and ¾ cup shredded 75 percent reduced fat Cheddar cheese. I would not bother, for a recipe that serves 10 people, to buy cheeses of different fat content. There were a couple of ingredients that were unfamiliar to me and I have been cooking for many years. Living in a rural area, I want a cookbook that has recipes with readily available ingredients. Unfortunately, if you don’t live near a Whole Foods or a comparable food store, you may find these recipes difficult to make. You also need to have a large family because most of the recipes are for 6-10 people.

Friday, March 20, 2015

If You Were Me And Lived In Hungary by Carole P. Roman

Next stop is – Hungary. Take your children or students on a trip around the world with Carole P. Roman’s If You Were Me and Lived In. series of interesting books that introduce children to cultures around the world.

The books begin with information about Hungary’s location, cities, and rivers.  There is a pronunciation guide in the back of the book, but also next to each word that may be confusing for young readers.  What I like about the books is that they describe things that children are most interested in and answer those questions that children would ask. What do you call your parents? Where do you go for fun? What kind of toys do you play with? What kind of foods do you eat?  The book also describes holidays, local events, schools, and much more. 


These books make learning about other people around the world a fun experience.  This is a very informative and entertaining series of books.  I highly recommend them for parents, grandparents, preschools and early educators.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

The Pewsitters, Skits & Devotions for Church and Home by Katherine Hussmann Klemp

This is the perfect book for anyone involved with a church women’s group, youth group, or special events in the church.  It can be a challenge to come up with an appropriate devotional message to present, but this book has a wide variety of appropriate devotions.  Each chapter contains a short skit, followed by scripture and a devotional. 

A wide variety of topics are covered such as the peace of forgiveness, following the call of God, and special devotions for holidays.  There are messages for a variety of interests and ages. The skits have a list of suggested props, costumes, sound, lighting, setting, and director’s tip.  They are not, however, overly complicated and usually only need a few of people. The devotions are meaningful and just the right length to hold the attention of your audience.

While designed for groups, this is also a wonderful book of devotions for individual use.  I highly recommend The Pewsitters, Skits & Devotions for individuals, church groups and church libraries.


I received a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Trigger Warning by Neil Gaiman

This was my first introduction to Neil Gaiman’s stories.  The book is a collection of short stories that are a mixture of strange, edgy, frightening, absurd, and confusing.  My favorites were The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains, February Tale, and Black Dog.


I wondered as I was reading if some of the stories were the beginning of a novel that was then abandoned. The stories were all so different that I really would not know what to expect next and left me confused about the author.  While some of the stories were interesting, some just left me shaking my head.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The Great Grammar Book by Marsha Sramek



The Great Grammar Book is an essential tool for students and writers.  The book begins with a one-hundred question diagnostic test to allow the reader to assess their strengths and weaknesses.  It is written in traditional text book style with brief explanations of the rules, followed by an exercise to put what is learned into practice. I thought the chapter on Successful Writing Strategies to be especially helpful.  My only criticism is with the way it is advertised as entertaining.   Some of the sentences given for editing were statements of trivial facts, but I did not read anything that added interest or entertainment value to the book.

Monday, February 16, 2015

Knitting Block by Block by Ncky Epstein

Afghans, scarves, sweaters, vests and more all made one block at a time. There are instructions for a variety of basic blocks using different stitch patterns, but then it goes one step beyond the basics. There are also instructions for a variety of embellishments, such as frames, bobbles, designs using i-cord, and even embroidery. Also included are fair-isle, embossed and other special stitches to offer a variety of ideas. The projects in the book are beautifully classic. They are neither old fashioned nor too modern. The instructions are clear and concise with both charts and written instructions. There very simple blocks for beginners, challenging blocks for advanced knitters, and more patterns for every skill level in-between. I was a little disappointed with the single page on “joinings”. Since this was a book to make things out of blocks, I expected more information on how to put the blocks together.

Sunday, February 8, 2015

Die Again (Rizzoli & Isles) by Tess Gerritsen

This was my first book in the Rizzoli and Isle series. Although there were some back stories, this was very much a stand alone book. It was quite gory with detailed descriptions of blood and guts – literally – at the crime scenes.  I genuinely liked the characters. I have seen the TV show, but did not expect them to be the same in the book. Maura was the closest and I could picture her similar to the TV version. Either way the book stood on its own.

It was an interesting mystery with crimes in the US and in Africa. The author did a wonderful job creating the mental images of the safari and the conditions in the jungle.  The jumping back and forth in time and place was done very well and I did not find it confusing at all. Perhaps the change to first person narrative helped make the transition clear.


It was a little confusing at the end but it certainly kept me guessing. This is a well-written story with a good mystery and culminates to a satisfying conclusion.

Friday, January 30, 2015

Rich in Years by Johann Christoph Arnold

Rich in Years, Finding Peace and Purpose in a Long Life is another wonderful book from Plough Publishing. Getting older is not an easy process, and we often confront fear, disappointment, and physical and mental changes. The author uses life experiences and the experiences of others to offer advice and encouragement as we face some of these life changes. 

I would say this book is primarily for Christians, and although I didn’t agree with every doctrinal statement in this book, I appreciated the author’s outlook on later years and the ability to use our talents or even find new ones.  There was not doubt that his focus was on our spiritual service.

You may think this book is just for old people, but I would also encourage younger people to read it too.  You will gain great insight into the thoughts of your parents or grandparents, and just may learn something to do now to prepare for the day when you walk where they are.  For those of us having reached these years, it can be a source of great encouragement and provide lessons for pressing on to make the time we have left a life of service and devotion.


Friday, January 23, 2015

The Awakening by Friedrich Zuendel

The Awakening is a story from 1841 with an important message for 2015.  This is the true story of Johann Christoph Blumhardt’s encounter with Gottliebin Dittis, a young woman overcome by demonic activity.  I usually avoid books about this subject, but this book is different. It is a respectful retelling of Blumhardt’s own writings not to sensationalize, but to show the real struggle with spiritual warfare.

Blumhardt approached each situation by putting on the full armor of God. The book states that when things took a serious turn, he would pray with a friend.  “Together we searched through the Bible, determined not to go any further than Scripture led us.”  His approach, his faith, his humbleness, and his honesty about his feelings made such an impression on me.  

Not only did he encounter the spiritual fight, but also resistance from the local authorities.  In spite of all of the obstacles, he saw a true spiritual awakening in his parish.  While the book is about demonic activity, it is even more about the importance of repentance, confession, and reconciliation and peace that comes from Christ.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in spiritual warfare.

One Step Too Far by Tina Seskis

One Step Too Far is a story of a young woman who walks away from her family and begins a new life.  There are hints and clues along the way that point to the reason, but the whole story isn't revealed until the end.  We know she has faced a traumatic event, but before we find out what had happened, the story is interrupted by endless back-stories for each of the characters, including those who have little to do with the plot.

The story was just too scattered. I felt like I was reading a book where the chapters were placed randomly in the book.  The beginning was slow moving and really didn't pique my interest until about 2/3 through  The author tries to trick the reader several times by writing situations that appear to give you a clue as to what is happening only to find out that it was totally different. Instead of being clever, I found it confusing and a little irritating.

The big reveal near the end of the book, although dramatic, just left me cold.  I can’t really explain much without giving a spoiler, so I will just say in my opinion the “event” and Emily’s adventure did not go together.  In spite of all of the drama, I didn't
find anything compelling or likable about the man characters.


This is an English book, but very friendly to the American reader. A few words were different, but nothing confusing. 

Thursday, January 15, 2015

The Berenstain Bears and the Biggest Brag By Mike Berenstain

What a wonderful book, but then it IS The Berenstain Bears!  The soft cover book is beautifully
illustrated, and has a wonderful message to go with it.  Grandpa imparts some wise help for his bragging grandcubs when the bragging gets out of control.  He makes them realize how silly all of their bragging seems when they stop to think about it.

On the inside of the back page of the book is an Activities and Questions from Brother and Sister Bear page with some questions children would ask about bragging, the actions of the cubs, and the lesson Gramps was trying to teach.  Also, there are two Get Out and Do It activities that will reinforce the lesson learned with action.


My four year old granddaughter loves the story and the illustrations of each of their activities. I recommend it for non-readers and early readers.

I received a copy of this book as part of the BookLook program in exchange for an honest review.

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Blue Ribbon Baking from a Redneck Kitchen by Francine Bryson

You just can’t go wrong with a cookbook written by someone who has won 200 local and national baking competitions. Sweets definitely take center stage in this cookbook, and it is loaded with pies, cakes, cheesecakes cobblers, sweet breads, cookies, and candy. 

The cookbook starts with eight different pie crusts, not counting the three extra cookie crusts.  The one that really caught my eye was the Cinnamon Roll Crust may be the most interesting pie crust recipe I have ever seen, and easy too.  I can’t wait to try it with pumpkin pie.  I also want to try her Classic Easy Banana Pudding, but since it serves 12- 15, I am hoping I can cut it in half.

The cookbook itself is very well made with glossy paper that is easy to wipe clean.  It could use more photos, and it seemed a little disorganized to me.  There are the regular sections, pies, cookies, cheesecakes, candy & Truffles, and Biscuits & Breads. But then there was the chapter “Sunday Go-To-Meeting” containing cobblers and cakes, and “Baked Goods to Show Off” with more pies and cakes.  All in all, it is a keeper and a welcome addition to my cookbook shelf.


I received a copy if this book as part of the Blogging for Books program in exchange for an honest review.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...